Find out your elegability for Alimony and Child Support in Lawrenceville and Norcross

Alimony in Georgia

Georgia is a state which allows one party in a divorce proceeding to receive alimony under the appropriate circumstances. The alimony can start during the separation, if both parties agree to it or if a judge orders it, and that temporary order can be changed as the divorce goes on and is finalized.

Whether one must pay alimony and the sum that is required is determined by several factors, but these must be presented properly. You may be the one entitled to receive the spousal support, but the court is not supposed to order support unless the party deemed responsible is able to pay.

An attorney can help you understand the process. If you are getting a divorce in the Lawrenceville or Norcross area, you should consult with a divorce attorney as soon as possible so that you know what will be required of you and what you are entitled to.

Who is eligible to receive child support?

When deciding whether to award child support at all, the Court will first look at the overall state of affairs of both parties. They will assess both assets and liabilities, including real estate, cash and debts. At this time, the Court will also consider the lifestyle the parties were accustomed to during the marriage.

The Court will consider what the parties contributed to the marriage. One party may have contributed more money by earning or inheriting, but the other party may have supported the marriage for many years by taking care of the home and children.

Finally, the Court will consider the current abilities of the parties to earn money or whether there is a need for education or just time to find a job.

How does the court determine the amount of alimony?

The Court considers several factors when determining how much alimony to order, and those factors will determine who pays, how much the person pays and for how long the payments will go on.

Usually, the person who makes the most money will be the one who is ordered to pay alimony. This can be either the husband or the wife, and is based on the fact that the parties depended on each other while they were married.

How long will the court require the alimony to be paid?

When the Court considers how long the parties have been married, it makes a difference if the parties have only been recently married or if they spent years or even decades together. Someone who has only recently married may not be entitled to spousal support at all, or it may be a short-term order to allow time for classes or job hunting.

On the other hand, someone married for longer may be entitled to long-term or even permanent alimony. Although this is rare, sometimes the Court may order permanent alimony for a spouse who cannot work because of health or age.

A divorce lawyer can help you consider these factors as they relate to you.


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